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Appellant Johnathan McCoy was convicted of felony murder and associated offenses in connection with the shooting death of LaShawn Beasley. On appeal, McCoy argued that he was improperly sentenced and that he received ineffective assistance of counsel. The Georgia Supreme Court agreed McCoy was erroneously sentenced; otherwise the Court affirmed McCoy's conviction. View "McCoy v. Georgia" on Justia Law

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Appellant Johnathan McCoy was convicted of felony murder and associated offenses in connection with the shooting death of LaShawn Beasley. On appeal, McCoy argued that he was improperly sentenced and that he received ineffective assistance of counsel. The Georgia Supreme Court agreed McCoy was erroneously sentenced; otherwise the Court affirmed McCoy's conviction. View "McCoy v. Georgia" on Justia Law

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Dequontist Lucas was tried by jury and convicted of murder, armed robbery, and other crimes in connection with the fatal shooting of Samuel Steward and the wounding of Demarco Tyler. Lucas appealed, claiming the trial court erred when it limited his cross-examination of two witnesses for the prosecution. The Georgia Supreme Court found no merit in these claims and affirmed. View "Lucas v. Georgia" on Justia Law

Posted in: Criminal Law

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Dequontist Lucas was tried by jury and convicted of murder, armed robbery, and other crimes in connection with the fatal shooting of Samuel Steward and the wounding of Demarco Tyler. Lucas appealed, claiming the trial court erred when it limited his cross-examination of two witnesses for the prosecution. The Georgia Supreme Court found no merit in these claims and affirmed. View "Lucas v. Georgia" on Justia Law

Posted in: Criminal Law

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Appellant Tacomsi Winters was tried and found guilty of felony murder and related offenses in connection with the shooting death of Dionte Bradley. On appeal, Winters argued she received ineffective assistance of trial counsel, and that the trial court committed plain error in instructing the jury. Finding no reversible error, the Georgia Supreme Court affirmed. View "Winters v. Georgia" on Justia Law

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Appellant Tacomsi Winters was tried and found guilty of felony murder and related offenses in connection with the shooting death of Dionte Bradley. On appeal, Winters argued she received ineffective assistance of trial counsel, and that the trial court committed plain error in instructing the jury. Finding no reversible error, the Georgia Supreme Court affirmed. View "Winters v. Georgia" on Justia Law

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Appellant Richard Morrison was tried before a jury and found guilty of the malice murder of his girlfriend Tammie Smith. He appealed pro se, asserting multiple claims of error. Having reviewed these claims, the Georgia Supreme Court found no merit to any of his claims, and affirmed his conviction. View "Morrison v. Georgia" on Justia Law

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Appellant Richard Morrison was tried before a jury and found guilty of the malice murder of his girlfriend Tammie Smith. He appealed pro se, asserting multiple claims of error. Having reviewed these claims, the Georgia Supreme Court found no merit to any of his claims, and affirmed his conviction. View "Morrison v. Georgia" on Justia Law

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Appellant Herbert Drews was convicted of crimes related to the death of James David Ayers, who was a 70-year-old man, and the aggravated battery of Troyce Warren. Appellant alleged the evidence was insufficient to show that he was an active participant in those crimes. He also argued his trial counsel rendered constitutionally ineffective assistance by failing to investigate allegations raised by a supplemental police report and attendant dashboard camera video. Finding no reversible errors, the Georgia Supreme Court affirmed Drews' convictions. View "Drews v. Georgia" on Justia Law

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Appellant Herbert Drews was convicted of crimes related to the death of James David Ayers, who was a 70-year-old man, and the aggravated battery of Troyce Warren. Appellant alleged the evidence was insufficient to show that he was an active participant in those crimes. He also argued his trial counsel rendered constitutionally ineffective assistance by failing to investigate allegations raised by a supplemental police report and attendant dashboard camera video. Finding no reversible errors, the Georgia Supreme Court affirmed Drews' convictions. View "Drews v. Georgia" on Justia Law